Human Resources > Salary Information > Guidelines > Supervisor Guidelines

Supervisor Guidelines

Specified titles are used for positions which meet the criteria for supervision described below:

  1. Incumbent supervises 2 or more FTE.

  2. Incumbents must exercise at least three of the following six supervisory functions. Each supervisory function is described in alternative terms. The incumbent must meet either alternative "a" or alternative "b", or both.

    1. Hiring Authority

      1. The incumbent actually selects who will be hired; OR

      2. The incumbent:

        1. Participates in the interview process; and

        2. Recommends to a higher-level manager who should be hired; and

        3. The higher-level manager customarily gives substantial weight to the incumbent's recommendation.

    2. Performance Evaluation Authority

      1. The incumbent independently determines the formal performance evaluation to be given to his or her subordinates and communicates those evaluations to his or her subordinates; OR

      2. The incumbent:

        1. Exercising independent judgment, initially decides what formal performance evaluations should be given to or recommend for his or her subordinates; and

        2. Submits his or her recommended performance evaluations to a higher-level manager for review or approval; and

        3. The higher-level manager customarily approves the incumbent's recommended evaluations; and

        4. The incumbent formally communicates the performance evaluations to his or her subordinates.

    3. Work Assignment Authority

      1. The incumbent exercises independent judgment in determining what work is to be done and the subordinate to whom it will be assigned; or

      2. The incumbent is assigned and/or given the work to be done by a high-level manager or faculty member and, as an exercise of independent judgment, determines the distribution of that work to his or her subordinates.

    4. Merit Increase, Promotion and Reclassification Authority

      1. The incumbent independently decides (but within normal budgetary and policy restraints): the amount of his or her subordinates' merit increases; who will be selected for a promotional opportunity; and which positions are to be recommended to the Personnel Manager for reclassification; OR

      2. The incumbent:

        1. Independently decides: the amount of merit increases his or her subordinates should receive or should be recommended for; who should be selected for a promotional opportunity; and which positions should be recommended to the Personnel Manager for reclassification; and

        2. Recommends the same to a higher-level manager; and

        3. The higher-level manager customarily given substantial weight to the incumbent's recommendations.

    5. Discipline and Discharge Authority

      1. The incumbent has the independent authority to issue written reprimands and warnings, to suspend and to discharge employees; OR

      2. The incumbent:

        1. Exercising independent judgment, determines what discipline should be imposed on his or her subordinates (e.g., written reprimand or warning, suspension, discharge, etc.); and

        2. Submits and/or recommends the same to a higher-level manager and or/to the Personnel or Labor Relations Office for review or approval; and

        3. The higher-level manager customarily gives substantial weight to and/or approves the incumbent's recommendation.

    6. Complaint and Grievance Resolution Authority

      1. The incumbent has the independent authority to resolve complaints and grievances lodged by his or her subordinates; OR

      2. The incumbent:

        1. Exercising independent judgment, initially formulates a resolution of the complaint or grievance lodged by his or her subordinates; and

        2. Submits the proposed resolution to a higher-level manager and/or to the Personnel or Labor Relations Office for review and approval; and

        3. The higher-level manager customarily approves the incumbent's proposed resolution.

  3. Incumbents must not be assigned to supervisory titles if the exercise of the above supervisory functions by the incumbent:

    1. Does not require independent decision-making

      "Independent decision-making" refers to the incumbent's opportunity to make a clear choice between two or more alternative course of action and is characterized by significant autonomy and control over the decision-making or recommending process.   For example:

      1. An incumbent who only screens applications to verify that mandatory job requirements are met but does not otherwise participate in the hiring process, does not exercise independent decision-making in the hiring process.

      2. An incumbent who requests and receives recommended performance evaluations from the various persons his or her "subordinates" have worked for, adds none of his or her own input and merely compiles the information into one "official" performance evaluation, does not exercise independent decision-making in the performance evaluation process.

      3. An incumbent who merely distributes work to "subordinates" according to directions from a higher-level manager does not exercise independent decision-making in the area of work distribution.

      4. An incumbent whose responsibility is merely to gather information relating to an incident which may result in discipline of a "subordinate" and to refer that information to a higher-level manager for appropriate action does not exercise independent decision-making in the area of employee discipline.

    2. Occurs only on a short-term relief basis or is not typical of the incumbent's normally assigned duties

      Where the incumbent's regular duties do not involve the exercise of the above-listed supervisory functions, but the incumbent does sit in as "acting" supervisor from time-to-time in the event of the higher-level manager's absence, the incumbent's performance of supervisory duties is not substantial enough to warrant assignment to a supervisory title.

      There is no specific "percentage of time spent supervising" requirement which will qualify or disqualify an incumbent from assignment to a supervisory title. However, if the incumbent only exercise supervisory functions on a relief basis, as indicated above, the incumbent is disqualified from assignment to a supervisory title even if the time spend as "relief" supervisor amounts to as much as twenty percent or more.

      On the other hand, so long as the incumbent has the authority to exercise the supervisory functions set forth above as part of his or her normally assigned duties, the incumbent is qualified for assignment to a supervisory title regardless of the percent time spend performing those functions.

    3. If the incumbent typically spends a substantial portion of his or her time performance work identical to that of the subordinates, the Personnel Manager should be consulted before the incumbent is assigned to a supervisory title.

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